Speakers

image

Joshua Bamberger*, M.D., M.P.H.


Dr. Bamberger led the San Francisco Department of Public Health’s (DPH) housing and health system of care from 1991 to 2018. During his time with DPH, Dr. Bamberger coordinated all medical and behavioral health services at the health department’s supportive housing programs, which grew from 1 building in 1999 to 43 buildings today, serving more than 1,750 tenants. In 2006, he helped establish the Housing and Urban Health Clinic, the first integrated health clinic designed to serve people in supportive housing. From August 2012 to January 2013, he was a Special Advisor to the Executive Director of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, the federal government’s homelessness policy agency. From 2013 to 2019, Dr. Bamberger was the Chief Medical Consultant for Mercy Housing, one of the largest developers of supportive housing in the United States. From 2018 to 2019, Dr. Bamberger worked with Kaiser Permanente to develop a plan to address homelessness among seniors in Oakland. Presently, Dr. Bamberger is a primary care physician at the Downtown U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs health clinic. In July 2019, Dr. Bamberger joined UCSF as Professor of Family and Community Medicine, focusing on homelessness and housing research and programs. Dr. Bamberger has been practicing family medicine with people living with poverty since 1989.

image

Carol Bianco-Miller


Ms. Bianco-Miller, Director of HHRN, has provided consultation and training to numerous federal agencies, state and local mental health departments, and community-based behavioral health organizations throughout the United States. Her areas of expertise include mental health and disability policy and systems change, organizational and program development, recovery-oriented services and systems of care, co-occurring disorders, homelessness, and supportive housing. She has extensive experience managing large federal contracts; has held key roles in several Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) projects; and leads teams providing technical assistance to states, local governments, and community-based organizations.

image

Aislinn Bird, M.D., M.P.H.


Dr. Bird is a psychiatrist with Alameda County Health Care for the Homeless. She recently co-founded Street Health, a backpack medicine team providing low-barrier psychiatric and substance use disorder treatment to those experiencing homelessness in downtown Oakland, California, encampments. She also works at the TRUST Clinic, an integrated care clinic serving those experiencing homelessness or at risk of becoming homeless. Dr. Bird graduated from the UCSF Public Psychiatry Fellowship in June 2017 and completed psychiatric residency at Stanford University, where she served as a chief resident. Prior to obtaining her M.D. at UC Irvine and an M.P.H. at California State University, Long Beach, she was an elementary school teacher, worked as a case manager at Community Focus-UCSF, and volunteered at the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in San Francisco.

image

Keyona 'Kee' Cooper, M.S.W., LGSW, Social Worker, Youth Enter Adulthood Ready (YEAR), Inc.


Keyona (Kee) Cooper is a native of Washington, DC; foster care alumna; and child welfare social worker. She is passionate about changing the negative narrative associated with youth who exit the foster care system. Ms. Cooper earned her B.S.W. from Shaw University and M.S.W. from North Carolina Central University. She is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC, where she uses her lived and professional experience in child welfare to advocate for system-wide change. She is the founder and president of a nonprofit organization, Youth Enter Adulthood Ready (YEAR), Inc., whose mission is to equip youth exiting foster care for adulthood through educational and vocational coaching, financial literacy programs, and housing support. Ms. Cooper also serves on the National Network for Youth’s National Youth Advisory Council.  

image

David Covington*, M.B.A., LPC


Mr. Covington is a behavioral health innovator, entrepreneur, and storyteller. Combined, RI and BHL employ nearly 1,800 staff in offices in 10 states and New Zealand. They deliver a full continuum of best-practice crisis services powered by customized software and technology solutions and real-time access to mental health and substance use services, diverting thousands from hospital emergency departments and justice systems to care in communities throughout the United States. Mr. Covington was a co-lead on the development of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Crisis Now exceptional practice standards in crisis care, and his impact is growing through the consulting, training, and crisis immersion experiences of RI and BHL. He is a founder of the international Zero Suicide, Crisis Talk, and Hope Inc. Stories initiatives. Prior to his work with RI, David served as a Vice President for Magellan Health’s Regional Behavioral Health Authority contract with Arizona’s Division of Behavioral Health Services and Medicaid authority.  

image

Sherri Downing


Ms. Downing is nationally recognized for her expertise in addressing homelessness and housing issues, particularly in rural/frontier areas. She has expertise in the issues that lead to and sustain homelessness in rural and urban environments, including poverty, domestic and sexual violence, trauma, chemical dependencies, mental health disorders, and co-occurring disorders. She has participated in creating resources on a range of topics, including substance use treatment, homelessness prevention, youth homelessness, veteran homelessness, Medicaid as a resource for addressing chronic homelessness, and more. She is currently the chair of her local Public Housing Authority’s Board of Commissioners.  

image

Anita Everett*, M.D. , DFAPA, Director of the Center for Mental Health Services, with guests Joseph Benson and Amy Grassette 


Dr. Everett is the Director of the Center for Mental Health Services. In this role, she provides executive leadership for federal efforts to improve the nation’s mental health service systems. Prior to her arrival at SAMHSA, she served as the Section Chief of The Johns Hopkins Bayview Community and General Psychiatry in Baltimore, Maryland. She was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. At Hopkins, she directed 22 community psychiatry programs that provided a range of services to individuals from preschool age to older adults and through a range of programs that include intensive acute services, as well as recovery support services for persons with serious mental illness. More recently at Hopkins, she has been involved with the leadership of health system behavioral health integration into accountable care structures. Earlier in her career, Dr. Everett served as the Senior Medical Advisor to SAMHSA. There, she worked on the promotion of access to quality services and access to medications in the Medicare prescription drug benefit. From 1999 to 2003, she served as the Inspector General to the Office of the Governor in the Department of Mental Health in Virginia. During this time, she completed more than 80 inspections of Institutions operated and licensed to provide mental health services in Virginia. She received the Patrick Henry award for outspoken advocacy. Dr. Everett has served on the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Advisory Council. She is active in several professional organizations, including the American Psychiatric Association, where she served as president in 2017 and from which she received a commendation for her work in healthcare reform. She is also a past president of the Maryland Psychiatric Society and the American Association of Community Psychiatrists. She has been engaged in a number of international projects, including consultation with the Ministries of Health, Department of Mental Health in Iraq and Afghanistan on the implementation of mental health services in these countries.

image

Marty Fleetwood,  J.D.


Ms. Fleetwood is founder and first Executive Director of Homebase of San Francisco. She now serves as Of Counsel. Homebase is a 50-person nonprofit legal and technical services firm working to advance solutions to homelessness. During her tenure, Ms. Fleetwood successfully developed local, regional, and national strategies to enhance both targeted and mainstream resources available to address homelessness. She has extensive expertise working with local, state, and federal government on homelessness policy, planning, and program development. She has worked with communities to implement homelessness prevention programming and to enhance access to housing and other needed services, including health and mental health care. She designs programs and facilitates start-up, develops agency- and community-level policies, helps secure funding, and supports performance evaluation. She is known as a thought leader, systems change designer, and master facilitator among state and federal agency department heads, local elected officials, community-based agency program staff, and homeless services consumers. 

image

Sheryl Fleisch, M.D.


Since 2010, Dr. Fleisch has worked in the field of homeless mental health. She is triple board certified in general psychiatry, consultation-liaison psychiatry, and addiction medicine and is the founding medical director of Homeless Health Services at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Her academic focus is to bring psychiatric consultation services—both in the hospital and on the streets—to persons who are experiencing homelessness, to teach community outreach to residents and medical students via a consultative model, and to combine informatics and policy to optimize financial impact on hospitals to improve real-time clinical outcomes for vulnerable patients. Dr. Fleisch has received national and international attention for her unique programming, along with numerous awards for innovation, teaching, humanism, and clinical excellence.

image

Michele Fuller-Hallauer, M.S.W., LSW


Ms. Fuller-Hallauer’s leadership responsibilities include continued collaboration, coordination, and resource and development efforts within the homeless service and behavioral health continua of care while spearheading system change in Southern Nevada. She has more than 14 years of experience as a Continuum of Care coordinator. As the Nevada Statewide Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Lead, Ms. Fuller-Hallauer had the responsibility of overseeing statewide implementation of HMIS. With more than 30 years in social work, she brings invaluable analytical and practical insights to the homeless services field. She serves as Co-Chair of the National Alliance to End Homelessness Leadership Council, in addition to serving on several national working groups.  

image

LaMont Green, D.S.W., LSWAIC, Lived Experience Coalition


Dr. Green recently served as King County’s Special Initiatives Director for the End Youth Homelessness Now campaign. He intersects his love for humanity and hunger for racial and social justice by joining with others to transform power structures toward a more equitable and humanizing society. Mr. Green has expertise in therapeutic interventions, community organizing, criminal justice reform, housing and homelessness issues, and youth and young adult engagement. He received his doctorate of social work on harnessing innovation to address the grand challenge of achieving equal opportunity and justice for all. 

image

Dave Katzenmeyer


Mr. Katzenmeyer currently serves as a Program Supervisor with Project Recovery and Street Outreach at People Incorporated Mental Health Services. He has worked directly with people experiencing unsheltered homelessness for nearly 10 years. People Incorporated’s homeless outreach services integrate mental health, medical, substance use, and support services to meet the diverse needs of adults experiencing homelessness. They provide a continuum of care, helping adults experiencing homelessness transition from the street to permanent housing while establishing an important link to ongoing customized mental health support services to maintain recovery.

image

Juntira Laothavorn, M.D.


Dr. Laothavorn is a board-certified addiction psychiatrist who provides psychiatric care to inmates at DeKalb County Jail in Atlanta, Georgia. She has provided street-based psychiatric care to people experiencing unsheltered homelessness through Mercy Care’s Street Medicine program. Dr. Laothavorn has a depth of knowledge from her work with individuals experiencing homelessness, particularly during and immediately following release from jail or prison, and is particularly skilled at using the evidence-based practice of Motivational Interviewing to help people progress through contemplating changes in addressing their opioid use disorders. Her interest in community and addiction psychiatry started while she was completing her medical degree from Morehouse School of Medicine. She completed her psychiatry residency at University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria and her addiction psychiatry fellowship at Emory University.

image

Mariel Lougee, M.D.


Dr. Lougee started working in homeless services long before beginning her medical career. She was a case manager at OPCC Daybreak Day Center in Santa Monica, California, working with women experiencing homelessness in Los Angeles. She continued to work in homeless health care during her medical training (at the University of Minnesota Medical School) and residency (Contra Costa Regional Medical Center Family Medicine Residency Program) and now works as a family physician in homeless health care. She does both street medicine and shelter-based care, as well as medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and addiction work. The Contra Costa Health Care for the Homeless team does street inductions, management, and follow-up with the street team as well as clinic-based MAT. Their team offers comprehensive services, including primary care, harm reduction tools, MAT, and connection to shelter services.

image

Brian Sims*, M.D


Dr. Sims is the Senior Medical Advisor for NASMHPD and a Senior Consultant for the NASMHPD Center for Innovations in Behavioral Health Policy and Practice, where he provides lectures and trainings nationally and internationally on the practice of Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) and developing strategies for systems to become trauma responsive, as well as the neurobiology and biopsychosocial impact of trauma. He provides numerous lectures and webinars on serious mental illness- and substance use disorder-related topics, with strategies for change to improve patient outcomes. Most recently, he has been a lead consultant for TIC in faith-based communities. Dr. Sims served with the state mental health system for 25 years before retiring and maintained a private practice for 10 years. He also served in the U.S. Army Reserves at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center with the 2290th Medical division, working with soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder

image

Emmy Tiderington, Ph.D., M.S.W., LMSW


Dr. Tiderington is a licensed social worker with extensive direct-practice experience working in housing and case management services for individuals with serious mental illness. Her research focuses on the implementation and effectiveness of supportive housing and other forms of homeless services as a means for ending homelessness and improving outcomes for service recipients. Specifically, she has examined the individual, organizational, and macro-systemic barriers to “street-level” policy implementation of person-centered care, harm reduction, and the management of risk and recovery in supportive housing. Her work also explores the mechanisms and processes by which homeless adults achieve recovery from substance abuse and serious mental illness. She is the recipient of the Robert Moore Award for Excellence in Scholarship from New York University, a New Investigator Award from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), an Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation of the Year Honorable Mention from the Society for Social Work and Research, and a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Predoctoral Fellowship from NIMH.

image

Dazara D. Ware, M.A., M.P.C.


Ms. Ware’s areas of expertise include assisting with the implementation of reentry in criminal justice settings and reentry plans for state departments of corrections facilities. Prior to joining PRA, she served as the State of Georgia’s SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) Program Coordinator and State Team Lead at the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities. While there, she led a pilot program to implement SOAR in Georgia’s state hospitals, jails, and prisons to promote successful transitions to community living. Ms. Ware earned her M.P.C. at Argosy University.

image

Deborah 'Deb' Werner*, M.A., PMP


Ms. Werner serves as the Technical Assistance Lead for HHRN, as the Project Director for the California Youth Opioid Response, and as a coach for the California MAT in Jails Learning Collaborative. Ms. Werner has been engaged in efforts to leverage individual and community assets to build quality supportive health, housing, and social services that improve resiliency, recovery, and social well-being for individuals, families, and communities since 1989. Her previous positions include Associate Director of Beyond Shelter, Inc., and Executive Director of the California Women’s Commission on Alcohol and Drug Dependencies. Ms. Werner is an organizational development and communications consultant, professional facilitator, and nationally recognized speaker and trainer.

image

Erin Whelan, M.S., LPC-S, LCCA


Ms. Whelan is the Senior Division Director for Housing and Homeless Services at LifeWorks, an organization that helps youth and families find their paths to self-sufficiency. She has worked in the social service field for more than 13 years, working with youth experiencing homelessness and as a therapist at Teen Living Programs in Chicago and the Settlement Home for Children in Austin, a residential treatment center for girls. Ms. Whelan’s current work focuses on the National Movement to End Youth Homelessness by 2020; she currently co-leads the Austin initiative. Ms. Whelan is also a Licensed Professional Counselor and Supervisor.

image

Patrick Wigmore


Mr. Wigmore coordinates Homebase’s federal program activity, including U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-funded homeless technical assistance, and provides a variety of technical assistance and training to communities and states. He conducts strategic planning processes, assists with program design and implementation, facilitates interagency and interjurisdictional coordination efforts, conducts system- and program-level evaluations, and coordinates needs assessments. He provides direct agency capacity-building support and delivers group trainings on a variety of program and policy issues. Prior to joining Homebase, Mr. Wigmore worked for the Corporation for Supportive Housing, overseeing extensive HUD-funded technical assistance efforts, facilitating best-practice program development, and carrying out program evaluations to improve effectiveness and inform planning and policy development.